"Pilots, Man Your Planes!"   
                                         WWII U.S. Naval Aviation Collector's Guide                                                                              
LTCR William R. "Killer" Kane, in his Hellcat on the deck of the U.S.S. Enterprise, circa June 1944, wears a fresh looking pair of  AN-6530s. The subtle differences between the two manufacturer's products make for easy identification in most vintage photos once you know what to look for. Here, the lower vent style and single line of engraving on the hinge make for a positive C.F.S. ID.

The U.S. Navy Catalog of Aeronautical Material, Spare Parts and Equipment, Class 37- Flight Clothing and Equipment, lists the parts and their stock numbers for these flight goggles as follows:

Frame...................R37-F-225
Lenses
    Amber..............R37-L-216
    Clear................R37-L-218
    Green...............R37-L-220
Clasps Metal, for use with elastic headbands on goggle frame....................R37-C-1525
Cushions,
Mask type.............R37-C-4250
Elastic Headband...R37-H-668
Ferrule...................R37-F-50
Sweat Pads...........R37-P-70
For use with all types of goggles 

The nickel plated goggle frame assembly consisted of a left and right half and the bridge screw of nickel plated steel. Width of the frame across the wearer's face was adjustable to three positions by resetting the bridge screw. Lens replacement was made by removing the diamond-knurled, oval shaped, steel ferrules from the headband attaching lugs at the temporal ends of the goggle frame. The C.F.S. production frames have the company name engraved on the wearer's left underside, but the A.O. products are unmarked. 

The single-pad cushion assembly designed specifically for these goggles, (called the "mask type" cushion by the Navy) was made up of a chamois-lined, sponge-rubber cushion with black painted metal retainer bands which were stitched on. There are three vents at the top and bottom of each eye opening, as previously noted. The "sweat pad" mentioned in the above list is the chamois lining, which was glued to the interior of the cushion, and was prone to deteriorate and stiffen after long hours of sun and sweat under a plexiglass cockpit canopy.

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AN-6530 Goggles